Reinharz, Jehuda Edit

Summary

Agent Type
Person

Name Forms

  • Reinharz, Jehuda

Notes

  • Biography/Historical Note

    Jehuda Reinharz, (1944– ) President of Brandeis, 1994– . Jehuda Reinharz was born in Haifa, Israel, in 1944. He received his high school education in Germany and immigrated to the United States as a teenager in 1961. Reinharz earned concurrent bachelors degrees from Columbia University and the Jewish Theological Seminary. He earned a master’s degree in medieval Jewish history from Harvard University in 1968, and a doctorate in modern Jewish history from Brandeis University in 1972. Reinharz was the first professor of Jewish history at the University of Michigan, from 1972 to 1982, where he established the program in Judaic Studies. In 1982, Reinharz came to Brandeis where he became the Richard Koret Professor of Modern Jewish History in the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies. He has been director of the Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry and the Jacob and of the Libby Goodman Institute for the Study of Zionism and Israel, which he founded. From 1991 to 1994, Dr. Reinharz served as provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. In 1994, he was named the seventh president of Brandeis University. Dr. Reinharz is the author of some 100 articles and twenty books in various languages. His book Jew in the Modern World (3rd edition, 2009) is one of the most widely adopted college texts in modern Jewish history. Reinharz is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Hebrew Union College, the Jewish Theological Seminary, Fairfield University, Ben Gurion University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. He is also a member of the following honorary societies: Royal Historical Society (1992); American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1995); and the Council on Foreign Relations (1999). In addition, he serves on a large number of boards and advisory committees. Reinharz and his wife, Shulamit Reinharz, a professor of sociology and director of the Women’s Studies Research Center and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute at Brandeis have two daughters, Yael and Naomi.

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